Category: Electrical Codes


UL® Conduit Coupling Marking Requirements

Not sure whether the rigid steel conduit coupling you are using has been manufactured and listed to UL safety standards? UL has released a bulletin clarifying the marking requirements for straight threaded conduit couplings shipped individually and in bulk. The clarification did not affect the requirements for couplings assembled on finished lengths of conduit supplied[…]

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2017 NEC Changes

Many factors go into determining the type of wiring method for your project — factors such as ease of use, cost and flexibility — but perhaps the most important consideration is which methods are allowed by the electrical code. The National Electrical Code® (NEC®), or NFPA 70, is a regionally adoptable standard for the installation[…]

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The Strength and Versatility of EMT

Choosing the right wiring method for the job is critical, which makes electrical metallic tubing (EMT) an excellent choice for contractors. Covered by Article 358 of the National Electrical Code® (NEC®), EMT provides physical protection and corrosion resistance, allowing it to be used in exposed, concealed or wet locations. It can also be used as[…]

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Steel Electrical Conduit Is Not Tested or Listed for Non-Electrical Applications

Because steel electrical conduit is readily available at local home improvement stores, it is tempting to use it for non-electrical projects, such as mechanical or structural applications. However, it is important to note that steel electrical conduit products are not evaluated or factory-tested for non-electrical applications. Furthermore, if structural steel is required for your project,[…]

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Simple Guidelines for Painting Steel EMT or Conduit

Want to paint your steel EMT or conduit, but don’t know whether painting complies with the National Electrical Code® (NEC®)? We are often asked this question. The NEC does not prohibit the painting of steel EMT or conduit, but it is important to maintain grounding continuity. The painting should be done after installation to maintain[…]

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The Inside Story of Steel Conduit and Tubing

Requirements for coatings on steel rigid metal conduit (RMC), intermediate metal conduit (IMC) and electrical metallic tubing (EMT) are included in the UL product standards as well as in the ANSI C80 standards for conduit and EMT. The National Electrical Code requires that these products be listed (see NEC sections 344.6, 342.6 and 358.6, respectively).[…]

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Electrical Rigid Metal Conduit: Steel (RMC) for Directional Boring

Directional Boring (DB), also called Horizontal Directional Drilling (HDD) is a trenchless method for installing electrical conduit for the protection of cable and wire circuits. It is used to install conduit beneath streets, highways, and railroad railbeds, as well as for other applications to accommodate aesthetic or environmental considerations. DB trenchless technology is gaining popularity[…]

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IMC Facts

  The questions and answers below are based on the current edition of the NEC®.  However, local codes can differ, and your authority having jurisdiction (AHJ) may have opinions that also differ. It is always important to verify your planned installation with the local AHJ. We’ve been asked several questions about the use of intermediate[…]

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